theangrybat:

My new book Morning sun is ready to be pre-ordered. The price is great, also the 2 extra photos for the special edition are only available during pre-order time. The last book America, my way is sold out and hopefully the new one will be also.

Order trade edition here: http://www.theangrybat.com/#morning-sun

Order special edition here: http://www.theangrybat.com/#morning-sun-–-special-edition

If you can’t order then spread the news!

Thanks to all blog followers!

Blackthorn Blossom in April

Tags: blackthorn

Spring Flowers

Bluebells and Celandine 

fictionwritingtips:

A great way to figure out character motivation is to ask your character what they need. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs explains that you need to fulfill certain basic needs before you can move onto the next stage of the pyramid. Once you have food, water, shelter, and…

"Successful writers will be CEOs of one-person, multimedia, multinational businesses who crowdsource their needs with a community of collaborators and rely on word of mouth to make their work sell."

— Michael Larsen, Director, San Francisco Writers’ Conference (via chadbourn)

the-new-frame-dot-com:

CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE TO SEE INSIDE
Masahito Agake - Namekuji Soshi Gaiden published by Sokyu-sha (2014)
I love this book. I really really do. I wasn’t sure what to expect. I hadn’t seen any of Masahito’s work prior to its release, but I am hugely impressed and so glad I got it. Even it’s design. Though quite simplistic in ways, it’s executed extremely well. It has a great feel. It’s nice to the touch, embossed titles on the cover and spine and its images are very nicely printed.
Masahito currently works as an architect. In the early to mid nineties Masahito’s passion for photography grew into something more serious after seeing work by Aleksandr Rodchenko and W. Eugene Smith. Self taught and without a mentor he’s developed his own way of seeing and his images really show his character. There’s humour in his work with a hint of a darker side. He’s captured some pretty fantastical moments. And his experience as an architect has given him an appreciation for the finer details. Street photography is very much about being in the right place at the right time and having the ability to seize the incredible scenes that appear before you. Masahito takes it further. He isn’t content just showing you things… he wants the viewer to see how he sees.
In the afterword, master photo editor, Akira Hasegawa speaks about Masahito’s aimless wondering (as a good thing). It’s that aimlessness that at least in part make the images so great. Without any specific intention, his mind was open to possibility. That being said, I do feel a certain connection between many of the images. He seems to enjoy uncovering hidden, secret moments. Those finer details in life most people will just walk past and not even realize existed. I sincerely look forward to seeing more of his work in the future.
Highly recommended

the-new-frame-dot-com:

CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE TO SEE INSIDE

Masahito Agake - Namekuji Soshi Gaiden published by Sokyu-sha (2014)

I love this book. I really really do. I wasn’t sure what to expect. I hadn’t seen any of Masahito’s work prior to its release, but I am hugely impressed and so glad I got it. Even it’s design. Though quite simplistic in ways, it’s executed extremely well. It has a great feel. It’s nice to the touch, embossed titles on the cover and spine and its images are very nicely printed.

Masahito currently works as an architect. In the early to mid nineties Masahito’s passion for photography grew into something more serious after seeing work by Aleksandr Rodchenko and W. Eugene Smith. Self taught and without a mentor he’s developed his own way of seeing and his images really show his character. There’s humour in his work with a hint of a darker side. He’s captured some pretty fantastical moments. And his experience as an architect has given him an appreciation for the finer details. Street photography is very much about being in the right place at the right time and having the ability to seize the incredible scenes that appear before you. Masahito takes it further. He isn’t content just showing you things… he wants the viewer to see how he sees.

In the afterword, master photo editor, Akira Hasegawa speaks about Masahito’s aimless wondering (as a good thing). It’s that aimlessness that at least in part make the images so great. Without any specific intention, his mind was open to possibility. That being said, I do feel a certain connection between many of the images. He seems to enjoy uncovering hidden, secret moments. Those finer details in life most people will just walk past and not even realize existed. I sincerely look forward to seeing more of his work in the future.

Highly recommended

"You have to know human behaviour … And the quality of your writing is absolutely capped at your understanding of human behaviour. You’ll never write above what you know about people."

Tony Gilroy (BAFTA/BFI Screenwriters Lecture)

(Source: jamesgrantbrown, via screenandscripts)

"The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."

Dorothea Lange (via sunlitwaterscape)

(Source: iandmphotography, via freelance-anthem)

Wood Sorrel

Tags: wood sorrel

Japanese Maples

"One way to keep your pain alive is to cling to corpses."

— T.R. Icarus (via thedrowningseaoflove)

(via freelance-anthem)

"Feedback is great for telling you what you did wrong. It’s terrible at telling you what you should do next."

Phil Libin (via austinkleon)

doublewides:

inflated building by darxmurf on Flickr.

Tags: xpan

javafernandez:

inside the cat at baldface.  there is no better place.

javafernandez:

inside the cat at baldface.  there is no better place.